Carnival Man
14th Feb 2016
Sunrise over Coquet Island
23rd Feb 2016

Druridge

There are many, many excellent photographic close-ups of wildlife that some very skilled photographers capture. Searching Flickr and other hosting sites bring up some fantastic images. On Flickr is Tim Mason  who lives near to me and his photos there and those on his website are astounding. These take a massive amount of time and stillness to capture as well as access to places where the wildlife is.

I am also a fan of landscapes that feature wildlife. Birds are an integral part of the landscape and waiting for the right moment for them to fit into a composition adds the need for timing. The shape of a dynamic flock of birds adds an unique dimension to a landscape. I like black and white for this kind of shot as it emphasises the shapes of the landscape and the individual birds and the form of the flock.

I went to the far end of Druridge Bay Country Park with the intention of walking along the path behind the dunes through the East Chevington nature reserve this morning. The reserve seemed to be totally devoid of wildlife except for the occasional corvid.

Crow

Crow

But, walking southwards I spotted a huge flock of geese towards Cresswell. I walked back to my car and drove farther south to see if I could get close to them. There are a lot of migratory Pink Footed Geese here at the moment and they are often settling on the fields behind the dunes between Druridge and Cresswell.

Distant Geese

Distant Geese

The road between Druridge village and Cresswell was closed so I parked and looked to see if I could spot the flock.  All I could spot initially was a mute swan on the fields.

Mute Swan

Mute Swan

I heard the geese before I saw them. Looking back to the north I saw the flock taking to the wing again and heading my way. They flew overhead and I thought they were going to head further south to the Cresswell Ponds, which I would not be able to reach without a detour because of the road closure.

Mute Swan and Pink Footed Geese

Mute Swan and Pink Footed Geese

Fortunately, they circled and landed in the fields behind the dunes on the road towards Cresswell. These fields are a regular stopping point for migratory geese.

Pink Footed Geese

Pink Footed Geese

Geese Landing

Geese Landing

This family of Whooper Swan were also making the most of the meadows. Unfortunately, a planning application is in for  these fields to become an opencast coal mine. This will displace the wildlife in the area forcing them into other habitats and thus disturbing other habitats.

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Whooper Swan

As the geese landed this murmuration of starling took to the wing; icing on the cake of an enjoyable trip out.

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Starling

 

 

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